Archive

 

 

Deep Inside Inner Experience

2009

Photograph diptych in artist's frames

44.45 x 30.48 cm and 25.4 x 30.48

Edition of 5

 

 

A bar in France with a not-so-subtle name, and a book by the French thinker Georges Bataille. While living in Dijon for a three months, I was reading this book and passing this bar on my daily comings and goings. Presented together, the diptych plays with their names, colors, and with Bataille’s transgressive fiction and writings on limit.

 

Exhibition history

- Take Form, Galleri Riis, Stockholm, 2014

- Signs of Life, curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, 2010

- Galerie Talant (as part of a FRAC Bourgogne residency), On the Beaten Path, 2009

- Les Samouraïs, FDC Brussels, curated by Lilou Vidal, 2010 (solo)

National Geographic

2009

Double slide projection and printed text

Variable installation

Edition of 3 + 2 AP

 

 

National Geographic consists of two side-by-side slide projections and a text component. The imagery in the piece is derived from a collection of the titular magazine from the 1970’s and 1980’s belonging to the artist’s late father. One projector shows a series of frontal views of different images of mountains, clipped from the magazine. Alongside, another projection shows the clipping’s corresponding back page, making literal a passage from one side of the mountain to the other. The text relays an intimate narrative that moves back and forth through space and time. There are 40 slide images in total that rotate in unison every 7 seconds. This text component can be treated in various ways. In one instance, it was printed on the exhibition’s take-way brochure; in another, it was made available on sheets of paper stacked on a shelf near to the slide projections.

 

Associated texts

- Review, Two Birds, Eighty Mountains and a Portrait of the Artist, Artforum, 2011 (343 KB)

- Text by Valerie Connor for "The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream. Curated by Paula Naughton, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, 2014 (256 KB)

- Artist's Project adapting National Geographic, Glänta, Issue 4.09 (2.8 MB)

 

Exhibition history

- Notes From Underground, Kunsthall Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway, 2017 (solo)

- The mind was dreaming the world was its dream, curated by Paula Naughton, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Dublin, 2014

- Two Birds, Eighty Mountains and a Portrait of the Artist, Arthouse at the Jones Center, Austin, 2011 (solo)

- Still / Moving / Still, curated by Marc Glöde, Cultuurcentrum Knokke-Heist, Belgium, 2009

Letters From Dr. Bamberger

2001-2012

Annual post-physical letters

Variable installation

9 - 5/8” x 6 - 5/8 inches each (9 total)

Unique

 

 

Letters From Dr. Bamberger consists of nine letters received from the artist’s former general physician, following annual physical check-ups. The letters could be regarded as a series of commissioned portraits made from language that dryly depicts the state of a body, and that also conveys what is an unusual, privileged occurrence within the dysfunctional and costly American healthcare system. The piece began when Lisa Tan lived in Los Angeles. It continued to be produced after she moved to New York in 2005. It’s when she gained resident status in Sweden where healthcare is socialized that the visits ended. Letters From Dr. Bamberger can be installed as a group or as individual letters dispersed throughout a space or series of spaces.

 

Associated texts

- Review, Two Birds, Eighty Mountains and a Portrait of the Artist, Artforum, 2011 (343 KB)

- First Take, by Christian Rattemeyer, Artforum 2006 (394 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- My Pictures of You, Galleri Riis, 2019 (solo)

- A nonspatial continuum..., Schleicher/Lange, Berlin, 2013

- Le Prince des Rayons, Galerie VidalCuglietta, Brussels, 2012

- Exhibition for a Transition Function, Hilary Crisp, London, 2011

- Two Birds, Eighty Mountains, and a Portrait of the Artist, Arthouse, Austin, 2011 (solo)

- Based on a True Story, Artists Space, New York, 2005

 

 

Moving a Mountain

2008

Found painting, photograph, framed text

Photo 152.4 x 182.9 cm, painting 52.4 x 62.5 cm, framed text 64.1 x 56.2 cm

Variable installation

Unique

 

 

Moving a Mountain is comprised of a found painting stolen from a hotel in Mexico City by the artist, a photograph of a painting by a commissioned landscape painter to mimic the style of a kitsch hotel painting, and a framed text that reads like a prose poem. The piece stems from a 24- hour “one night stand” – a trip devised by the artist, in which she travels to a foreign city, walks around all night with no preconceived plan and returns home the following morning. The piece has been exhibited in multiple locations since it was produced for a solo project with the long shuttered gallery D’Amelio Terras in New York, moving the mountain farther away from its source than ever could have been anticipated.

 

THE FRAMED TEXT READS  It was the Day of the Dead, and the city was decorated with orange clusters of candles and marigolds.   I took a walk down the Alameda to the Zocalo, and tried to find a restaurant my guidebook described as “inexplicably” decorated with pictures of mountains. I imagined an arrangement of several yellowing framed photographs, but when I found the address, it was closed.  It was after midnight, and I decided to return to my hotel, a modest colonial-style accommodation on Avenida Bolívar. When I closed the door behind me, I heard two lovers in the room above.  One was sighing gracefully in a distinct rhythm. I took down my ponytail, began to undress, and then looked at a painting hung between the beds. I marveled at the sounds as I stared at the painting, a snow-capped mountain with a lake and a field of pink flowers.  I mused at how the mountain exists with beautiful indifference. The residue of the evening mingled with the lovers above me, and I moved closer to the painting, closer to its peak. Several months later, I decided to go back to Mexico City to take the painting, and replace it with another mountain—the one that I grew up with.

 

Associated texts

- Moving a Mountain text (17 KB)

- Artforum.com Critics Pick for Moving a Mountain, D'Amelio Terras, 2008 (664 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Notes From Underground, Kunsthall Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway, 2017 (solo)

- Sunsets, Galerie VidalCuglietta, Brussels, 2012 (solo)

- Llama, organized by Lisa Oppenheim, Conduits, Milan, 2010

- Archeology of Longing, curated by Sofia Hernandez Cuy Chong, Kadist Foundation, Paris, 2008

- Moving a Mountain, Front Room Exhibition, D'Amelio Terras, New York, 2008 (solo)

 

 

The Baudelaire Itineraries

(see each caption for the titles of each work in series)

2007

Archival ink on canvas in artist's frame, photograph in artist's frame

Dimensions vary for each diptych, all photographs 32 x 24 cm

Edition of 1 + 1 AP complete installation

Edition of 2 + 1 AP diptychs and individual photographs

 

 

This is a series of prints on canvas and photographs that propose travel itineraries to see works of art referenced in the footnotes of Charles Baudelaire's review of the Salon of 1846. This salon marked the end of the Romantic movement and the beginning of Decadence which Baudelaire, dandy and Symbolist poet, was a leading figure. All works are derived from Jonathan Mayne’s Art in Paris 1845-1862, Salons and other Exhibitions, Reviewed by Charles Baudelaire, published 1965 by Phaidon Press Limited. The footnotes are a combination of Baudelaire’s and Mayne’s.

 

The Baudelaire Itineraries, along with works such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, One Night Stand (Paris), and The Seven Year Itch, comprise instances in Lisa Tan’s oeuvre in which a kind of wanderlust by proposal is engaged. In approximating an encounter with any given historical place, event, or object found in her proposals, Tan relies on how any viewer is an individual vessel of image culture. The works consider how representation informs our understanding of the world – or lack thereof – perhaps most so in those cases of which we have no first-hand experience.

 

Associated texts

- Review, The Baudelaire Itineraries, Artforum, 2007 (238 KB)

- Courtney Schum. Distance and Intimacy: The Role of Ekphrasis in Lisa Tan’s The Baudelaire Itineraries, 2018 (3 MB)

 

Exhibition history

- Shiver in the Shift, curated by Eva Gonzalez-Sancho, Parra & Romero, Madrid, 2012

- Sur le Dandysme, curated by RMS La Asociación, Centro Galego de Arte Contemporánea, Santiago de Compostela, 2010

- Ambassador Suites, organized by Katarina Burin, Galerie Lucile Corty, Paris, 2008

- The Baudelaire Itineraries, Andreas Grimm München, 2007 (solo)

 

Les Samouraïs

2010

Digital video with sound, light stands, painted wood,

projector, text component revealed in variable ways

Duration of projection, 3 min 36 seconds, continuous loop

Edition of 3 + 2 AP

 

 

Les Samouraïs takes the opening scene from Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le Samouraï (1967), and through image and sound, makes an alteration by adding an additional caged bird to the auteur’s opening scene. The simple gesture foils the film’s theme of isolation while fictitiously modifying an occurrence within historical reality. The protagonist, played by Alain Delon, is an assassin who adheres to a life of solitude and detachment. In the opening scene he finishes a cigarette in bed, walks over to the bird—the only creature he truly connects with—and then puts on his trench coat and hat before closing the door behind him to face the world outside. Melville wrote, directed, and edited his films, including Le Samouraï, in Studios Jenner in the 13th arrondissement in Paris. While finishing the film, the studio was destroyed by a fire and the female finch was the only casualty.

 

Associated texts

- 500 Words, Les Samouraïs, artforum.com, 2010 (237 KB)

- Review, Two Birds, Eighty Mountains and a Portrait of the Artist, Artforum, 2011 (343 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Two Birds, Eighty Mountains, and a Portrait of the Artist, Arthouse, curated by Elizabeth Dunbar, Austin, 2011 (solo)

- Stand Opposite the Chorus, curated by Laura Mott, Galerie Rotor, Gothenburg, 2011

- Time's Arrow, curated by Ben Loveless, Galerie Nordenhake, 2010

- Kierkegaard's Walk, curated by Jacopo Crivelli Visconti, Galeria Marília Razuk, São Paulo, 2010

- Les Samouraïs, FDC Brussels, curated by Lilou Vidal, 2010 (solo)

 

 

Video link

 

 

The Garden of Earthly Delights

2004

Photograph in artist's frame

38 x 98 inches

Edition of 3 + 2 AP

 

 

The photograph is an itinerary to see all of the paintings by Hieronymus Bosch that exist in public and private collections world-wide, including The Garden of Earthly Delights (1503-1504) in the collection of the Museo Nacional del Prado. The top half of photograph shows a list of the works, the middle portion describes the length of stay in each city, and the bottom half lists hotel accommodations and means of transportation.

 

“Originating in London and concluding in New York, the meticulous intercontinental itinerary comprises 124 days of travel. The work takes the form of an eight-foot-long white-on-black chart; the trip itself, never consummated, remains an unfulfilled possibility—and is perhaps all the more satisfying for that.” -Christian Rattemeyer on Lisa Tan, Artforum, January 2006

 

Associated texts

- First Take, by Christian Rattemeyer, Artforum 2006 (394 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Based on a True Story, curated by Christian Rattemeyer, Artists Space, New York, 2004

- Lisa Tan, Grimm|Rosenfeld (now Andreas Grimm München), Munich, 2005 (solo)

2 Americans

2010

letterpress on paper in artist's frame

65 x 85 cm

Edition of 5

 

 

The barely visible “blind-stamped” text is lifted from a New York Times article on the crash of Air France flight 447. Starting with "2 Americans", ending with "2 Swedes and a Turk", the alphabetized list of passenger nationalities is a temporary stand-in for a permanent loss. The list, and others like it, begins a curious process of personal and political identification that occurs in relation to nationality.

 

Associated texts

- Review, Monopol Magazin Für Kunst Und Leben, 2011 (71 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Take Form, Galleri Riis, Stockholm, 2014

- What follows is an ordinary situation, an episode to be related and forgotten, Andreas Grimm München, 2011 (solo)

- Art Brussels, Galerie VidalCugiletta, Brussels, 2011

- North Drive Press #5, New York, 2010

 

In Search of the Forgotten, Letters from Mme de Forget to Eugène Delacroix

(each print has its own number that follows the series title above)

Archival ink-jet with chine-collé in artist's frame

38 x 50 cm each print

Edition of 1 + 1 AP

 

 

The series of delicate chine-collé prints reveals an enduring friendship, captured in the letters written to the major figure of French romantic painting from his life-long best friend and former lover, Joséphine de Forget. With his status, Delacroix's letters to de Forget – and to others – have been transcribed, translated and made into books. The impetus for this work was to give voice to Mme de Forget. A research hunt ensued, taking the artist to the Frick Collection Reference Library in New York, to Musee Delacroix and antiquarian galleries in Paris, and finally to the Archives départementales du Val-de-Marne, where a substantial quantity of de Forget’s letters are archived.

 

Associated texts

- Review, Monopol Magazin Für Kunst Und Leben, 2011 (71 KB)

- Review for Two Birds, Eighty Mountains, and a Portrait of the Artist, Artforum, 2011 (343 KB)

- Transcription and translation of a selection of the Mme de Forget's letters (83 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- What follows is an ordinary situation, an episode to be related and forgotten, Andreas Grimm München, 2011 (solo)

- Two Birds, Eighty Mountains, and a Portrait of the Artist, Arthouse, Austin, 2011 (solo)

 

Recoleta

2006-­2010

40 pencil on paper frottage drawings, cloth-covered clamshell box with ribbon

10.25 x 13.25 inches, each drawing, 12.75 x 15.75 x 1.25 inches, box

Unique

 

 

We often preserve the memory of an indefinable charm from these towns we’ve merely brushed against. The memory indeed of our own indecision, our hesitant footsteps, our gaze which didn’t know what to turn towards and that found almost anything affecting... — George Perec

 

To be immortal is commonplace; except for man, all creatures are immortal, for they are ignorant of death; what is divine, terrible, incomprehensible, is to know that one is immortal. — Jorge Luis Borges

 

 

“The cemetery’s giant vaults, stacked along avenues inside the high walls, resemble the rooftops of a fanciful utopian town from above," read my guidebook.  I packed a pad of 11 x 14 inch paper and black pencils. And after we arrived back to Buenos Aires from the northern Patagonian Pampa I visited the cemetery. I then spent several days making grave rubbings of the mausoleums—avoiding any text or overly decorative textures.

 

The walk from the hotel to the Cementerio de la Recoleta took me past a small bakery, then the Israeli Embassy Memorial (bombed in 1992), across Avenida 9 de Julio—the iconic wide street that bears the white obelisk. Then past an ornate fountain near the Brazilian and French embassies, fancy retail spaces, a grand hotel, and finally, a family of huge Banyan trees. Along the way, international modernist apartment buildings—so plentiful in downtown Buenos Aires—lent a decidedly cosmopolitan tone. Coming home from those days of rubbing graves, I tried to grasp the relationship between the built space around me and the unknowable.

 

The next time I went back to BA was to make a series of large grave rubbing drawings (84 x 48 inches each). An effort to capture the scale of the mausoleums, impressive monochromes, imbued with weight and aura. It took the better part of a day to make one. But when the suite of drawings arrived back to my studio in New York, I had to reckon with how they failed to hold resonance. The small drawings from my first trip were still convincing though. They could be inventoried in a single stack. I could hold and flip through them. One structure after another.

 

 

Made with the support of Eloisa Haudenschild, and also to Hernán Reig.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alter Nordfriedhof

2007-2011

Photographs in artist's frame

63,5 x 93,5 cm

Edition of 5 + 1 AP

 

 

A collection of snapshots taken in the Alter Nordfriedhof cemetery on a spring day, in Munich. Vines and flowers have obscured all but each of the tombstone's general shape. Through the use of repetition and the apparatus of archival structures, an elegant ontological study transforms into a poetic meditation on mortality.

 

Associated texts

- Review, Monopol Magazin Für Kunst Und Leben, 2011 (71 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Galleri Riis, Gallery artists, 2017

- On The Passage of a Few, Simon Preston Gallery, New York, 2013

- What follows is an ordinary situation, an episode to be related and forgotten, Andreas Grimm München, 2011 (solo)

 

 

 

 

 

Language Barrier

2009

Digital two-channel video projection

Continuous loop, silent

Variable installation with height of projections 230 cm

Edition of 3 + 2 AP

 

 

The video shows the glass-encased entrance lobby of an International Style high-rise apartment in an affluent neighborhood of Buenos Aires – at nighttime. A recurring mechanism takes the viewer past the length of the lobby repeatedly, as the position of a doorman changes with each successive pass. Jacopo Crivelli Visconti writes: ”Each time the camera slides by, the doorman is in a different position: first he is sitting down, reading; then he is looking out of the building; a third time, he is standing up. In another shot the camera glides through the lobby and the doorman is nowhere to be seen: he may have gone or perhaps he has not arrived yet; there is no way of knowing, as the time of this video is not linear but confusing and enigmatic, like that of La Jalousie, the novel by Robbe- Grillet in which we also time and time again witness scenes that are the same yet not the same.”

 

Of the video’s title, Language Barrier, Crivelli Visconti continues. “In the first instance the reading would be obvious: as the artist herself says, ‘the glass boundary separates the lobby doorman and the pedestrian like a language barrier’; like a glass membrane which separates the doorman’s gaze from that of the artist who walks down the street (and from ours), the linguistic barrier is a fragile and almost invisible barrier, yet it separates two worlds, complicating the conversations of travellers and healthily confounding the certainties of those who stay behind. However, it may not be entirely wrong to think that language is, in itself and independently of the differences between languages, a barrier. Just like glass, language is a transparent barrier that, as it separates and protects, becomes more invisible the more we look at it. There is—as works such as Language Barrier prove so extraordinarily—a hidden poetry in the materiality of things...”

 

Associated texts

- The Transparency of Language by Jacopo Crivelli Visconti (74 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Language Barrier, Centro Cultural Montehermoso, Vitoria-Gasteiz, 2009 (solo)

 

One Night Stand (Paris)

2006

Single channel video projection

22 minutes 11 seconds, silent

Variable installation

Edition of 3 + 2 AP

 

 

The video consists of subtitles against a constant black background. The subtitles are derived from notes that Tan wrote over the course of a trip from New York to Paris, which lasted 24 hours. Drawn to the properties of nighttime in a foreign city for the way it evokes a sense of alienation outside of any social order and elicits transformative states, she devised a “one night stand” – selecting Paris as her first encounter (Mexico City was second, which resulted in her piece Moving a Mountain). With no preconceived itinerary, the only self-issued precept was to roam the city alone past midnight while keeping a notebook. In this image-less piece, Tan relies on how each of us is an individual vessel of image culture. Even if a viewer has had no first-hand experience of Paris, it is invariably part of what Felix Gonzalez-Torres has called “blood memory” – a knowing sense of a place that is a result of the processes involved in inhabiting – not from actual physical presence – but through an experience of multitudinous representations.

 

Associated texts

- Video transcript (152 KB)

- Review, One Night Stand, LAXART, Art Papers, 2007 (176 KB)

- Review, House Call at Three's Company, Art F City, 2009 (70 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- One Night Stand, curated by Lauri Firstenberg, LAXART, Los Angeles, 2006

- House Call, curated by Alex Gartenfeld and Piper Marshall, Three's Company, New York, 2009

Books

(the series is informally referred to as Books and each

photograph has its own distinct title.  See captions)

2006

Digital c-print in artist's frame

Dimensions variable for each work

Edition of 3 + 2 AP

 

 

Lisa Tan relocated to New York from Los Angeles and moved in with her boyfriend at the time, also an artist, which resulted in their respective libraries converging. The photographs create an index of the books they own in common as a type of portraiture. The titles of the works humorously play off of their coupling, for instance, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness becomes Two Hearts of Darkness. The photographs take up individual subjecthood as it is formed in part by the shared experiences of literature – and in the case at hand – the books are indicative of an iteration of a certain American liberal arts education. Still, no matter how many common references two people might share, a gap always exists between the spines.

 

Associated texts

- Text by Monika Szewczyk for the exhibition Ex-Libris, Galerie VidalCuglietta, Brussels, 2011 (655 KB)

- 94 at 34, My Grandmother and Alain Robbe-Grillet, This Long Century, entry 27, 2009 (111 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Difference and Repitition, curated by Jacopo Crivelli, Galeria Raquel Arnaud, São Paulo, 2012

- Ex-Libris, Galerie Vidal Cuglietta, Brussels, 2011

- There is No(w) Romanticism, curated by Lilou Vidal, FDC Brussels, 2009

- Sturm und Drang, Galerie Kamm, Berlin, 2008

- Local Transit, curated by Brian Butler, Christian Rattemeyer, Artspace, Auckland, Artists Space, New York, 2006

- Lisa Tan, Grimm|Rosenfeld, New York, 2006 (solo)

 

 

Broken Baccarat

2006

Lead crystal glass, digital c-print, acrylic, and lacquer

Print:  framed 12 x 12 inches

Pedestal:  38 x 6 x 6 inches

unique

 

 

A friend gave me a lead-crystal sphere as a gift. I threw it out of my two-story window.

 

Associated texts

- Review, “Happenstance,” The New York Times, December 30, 2005 (63 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Happenstance, curated by Lauri Firstenberg, Harris Lieberman, 2006

 

 

 

A Kiss for Fredrik Nilsen

2004 - 2005

Color-aid paper, lipstick, piezo print, photographs

15 x 21 3/4, 24 x 30 3/4, 35 x 42 inches

Unique

 

 

A piece of red Color-Aid paper, stained with my lip-stick kiss, then documented until the kiss disappeared completely.

 

Associated texts

- First Take, by Christian Rattemeyer, Artforum, 2006 (394 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Lisa Tan, Grimm|Rosenfeld (now Andreas Grimm München), Munich, 2005 (solo)

Ellsworth Kelly

2004

Engraved Card, Acrylic and Painted Wood

8 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 33 inches, 4 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 5, 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 38 inches

Edition of 3

 

 

Engraved cards that were made for the artist Ellsworth Kelly as a meditation on his name and oeuvre, and as a thank you gift.

 

Associated texts

- First Take, by Christian Rattemeyer, Artforum, 2006 (394 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Mind Over Manner, Grimm|Rosenfeld (now Andreas Grimm München), Munich, 2004

- Game Over, Grimm|Rosenfeld, (now Andreas Grimm München) Munich, 2005

Seven Year Itch

2005-2011

Pencil on vellum

Framed 7 3/4 x 8 1/4 inches each

23 drawings in custom made box

Unique

 

 

During the seventh year of living in Los Angeles, Tan gained access privileges to the Getty Research Institute. She would spend her evenings researching the Institute’s extensive collection of travel books. A seductive set of Italian travel guidebooks from the Touring Club Italiano caught her attention. The resulting piece consists of twenty-three frottage drawings of the covers of the books from each region in Italy.

 

Associated texts

- First Take, by Christian Rattemeyer, Artforum, 2006 (394 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Art Brussels, Galerie Vidal Cuglietta, 2013

- Lisa Tan, Grimm|Rosenfeld (now Andreas Grimm München), Munich, Germany, 2005 (solo)

- Sixteen:One, Los Angeles, 2005

 

 

 

Wall Treatments

2001

White paint and wood

Variable dimensions

 

 

 

The 2001 USC Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition took place in a vast unoccupied floor of a high-rise office building in downtown Los Angeles. In various parts of the space, sections of wall were finished with moulding and paint.

 

Exhibition history

- 8th and Figueroa, USC Master of Fine Arts exhibition, 2001

Video link

The Indolent Leopard

2006

A cocktail consisting of

1 1/2 oz cognac, 1 oz lemon juice, 1 tsp sugar,

6 oz champagne, 1 cantaloupe ball in a champagne flute

 

 

The Indolent Leopard was created with a tradition of artist-conceived cocktails in mind.  It was made site-specifically for artist's editions that Cay Sophie Rabinowitz and Christian Rattemeyer curated for the Standard Miami Beach during Art Basel Miami, in 2006, at the height of the fair's popularity.

 

Exhibition history

- The Standard Hotel Basket Editions, curated by Christian Rattemeyer, The Standard Hotel Miami Beach, 2006

- The Evening Before the Morning After, organized by Mario Garcia Torres, Celeste Tea Room, Mexico City, 2011

Magazine Portraits for Friends

ongoing

c-print

46.75 x 35.95 cm each

unique

 

 

Gifts for friends.

 

 

 

Alle Worte, die sich nicht allein mit Worten beschreiben lassen (Duden, Mannheim 1970)

and Bilder, die alle Worte beschreiben, die sich nicht allein mit Worten beschreiben

lassen (Duden, Mannheim 1970)

2011

80 x 128 cm

archival ink-jet on paper

Edition of 5

 

 

Two sister works' titles translate to: “All the words that cannot be described by words alone” and “The images that describe all the words that cannot be described by words alone.”

 

Associated texts

- Review, Monopol Magazin Für Kunst Und Leben, 2011 (71 KB)

 

Exhibition history

- Llama 2, organized by Ana Cardoso, Nuno Centeno, Porto, 2011

- What follows is an ordinary situation, an episode to be related and forgotten, Andreas Grimm München, 2011 (solo)

 

Counting Words

2008

18 x 24 inches

archival ink on paper and photograph

unique

 

 

An inventory of words that play off of each book's title. The worn snapshot in the left corner served as the bookmark.

 

Exhibition history

- Sturm und Drang, Galerie Kamm, Berlin, 2008

- Volta, Andreas Grimm München, Basel, 2008

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